Unboxing January 2017 Dungeon Crate

Unboxing this months Dungeon Crate “offering symbols of peace, luck adventures, and missteps all things we encounter throughout a year of gaming.”

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January’s box contains a D20 yin/yang t-shirt from armorclass10.com. While we really like the design of this shirt we are not enthused about the way the design is printed on the material, similar styles in the past have cracked and faded rather quickly. It also has the armorclass10 logo printed on the top center of the back.

Next, we have a  Ki-Rin coin from Rare Elements Foundry. “Ki-Rin are a race of aerial creatures whose hooves rarely touch the earth, for they dwell amid the clouds and behind the winds. Females are never encountered and Ki-Rin are always solitary. They sometimes aid humans if the need to combat evil is great. The coat of Ki-Rin is luminous gold, much as a sunrise on a clear day.” This coin has some good weight to it and is a good size, but it is a little awkward for flipping because of its size. It has some fine detail and the aged look it has is nice with a four-eyed Ki-Rin on one side and the Rare Elements Foundry logo on the other. (quarter for size reference)

 

Then we have a critical fumble deck from Nord Games. This is a full set of 52 full-color cards for when you roll natural 1’s. Each card has four entries, one for each attack type; melee, ranged, natural, and magic and includes a severity level in the upper right corner of each card ranging from Awkward (recommended for lvl 1) to Disgraceful (recommended for Lvl 13).  This is our first encounter with the deck and some of the “fumbles” seem silly in the scenario, we were able to play out some of the fumbles but others were unnatural to roll play out.

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We also got a mini adventure “The Pententieyrie” from Adventure a Week, suitable for 5th edition Lvl 4-5. “An ancient carving, an avian goddess, and a demonic path to adventure await.” These are great little adventures easy to throw into a campaign for those times when the DM just isn’t quite as prepared as you would like to be and need a little more time.

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There was also the digital crate that came with a PDF of the Pententieyrie AAW, a PDF Adventure Chronicle e-zine from AAW and a PDF 5th edition character sheet by Javier Aumente that has a layout that we really like because it seems like it will be easier for the kids to use.

That’s it for this months box, there wasn’t as much as there has been in previous month’s boxes the reason for this being that the items in the box were a higher price. At first, we were kinda excited about the T-shirts inclusion but after some thought had a change of mind, while I do like the shirt I would prefer to see more content like from previous boxes. Overall we were a little underwhelmed with this month’s box but do understand the reasons for less content and that sometimes its trial and error with things.

*We are not endorsing any particular brands and were not paid for this review

Class: DM Level: 1 XP: 25/100

I suppose an introduction is in order. This is a new blog department for my adventures as a brand new DM. I thought it would be fun to chart my experiences as a growing Game Director from day one. A little background for flavor, I am in my mid-thirties and a couple weeks ago I began my first campaign as a Game Master. I recently started actual play earlier this year. I had tried a couple of smaller campaigns and played for a few sessions before, once in high school and once shortly after my wife and I got together. I have been watching videos from many of the YouTube channels that talk about D&D and role playing in general. This has been a great help, and I want to add my own “voice” to this quickly growing ocean.

I started this campaign to act as a filler for when my wife doesn’t have much prepared for her own campaign. This creates an easier path for me to get into the Game Master aspect of the game. Also, I am set on making this more for my children (5 and 6 who also play in my wife’s campaign) and keeping it light and fun. Bearing this in mind, and pulling an idea from my bank, I decided to play my “Killjoys” idea. A group of random characters who take on “warrants” for people in various cities. I do not at the moment have a long term plan, especially since this is mostly supplemental play every couple weeks or so. Maybe one day I will advance it towards a more concrete story plot, but for now, it keeps things simple for me and the family.

I feel this approach is great for working with children who are being introduced for the first time without having to oversimplify the core mechanics. Bearing in mind, my children have been playing for several months now and started out in a similar fashion but with the most basic of rules to see if they would even like it (you can find information on that here) It is also good for the starting DM because there doesn’t have to be as much pressure to develop a year-long story concept that relies on the players doing certain things. I think this lack of pressure helps to establish the things I feel are important to develop a successful Director:

    • How to avoid railroading (at least too much)
    • Being able to play on the fly (as we some of us know and the rest will learn, that is going to happen nearly every game)
    • Being prepared (a little ironic from the last point but its does help to have some basic outline of what you want to accomplish, there must be a goal)
    • Finding your own flavor (interpreting the rules in your own way, home-brewing and house rules)

That is not to say there is anything wrong with the opposites of any of the aforementioned topics. Everyone has their own style and each group their own method of play and you’ll find yours as you go along.

One last thought on this point, a game of this style gives you the freedom to try all the different styles of play and game refereeing with very little consequence. If you have played games before as a player and wanted to try a different interpretation of the rules then go for it. The worst that will happen is that it won’t be as successful and you will know not to do it again or find out what needs to be fixed to make it a good mechanic. An easy and common place to start is critical success/fail. For example, I made up my own very simple table but I also play off of things that happen in the moment. Other people use double dice on damage for a success and kind of ignore fails or make it up as they play things out. The most important thing is to let your players know what you are doing from the start.

This was my jumping off point. I had put a little preparation into it…about 5-6 hours worth, maybe. I had figured on having a couple of weeks to prepare but everyone was so excited to play their new characters that I was kind of shoehorned into it. Most of the prep time went into designing the map for this world (yeah I’m going all in right from the get-go). This was unintentional but turned out to be the cornerstone for the whole thing, despite the fact that I am not developing a long-term game plan.

First I needed to develop a set of individual story ideas that each character could be doing. My wife and I did Session Zero collectively with the kids to develop the characters. Everyone got to start at a little higher than level one, but I set it no higher than level 5 and everyone made their characters (with some guided background). I used the information from that to start in the world building process. But, I needed a thing for them all to do, a reason to come together.

Along the way, I remembered a one shot encounter that I received through Dungeon Crate and thought it would be a great first mission for my group. All I had to do now was bring them together. Which meant I needed to know where they were all from so I could set up how they meet. So this is about the time I started looking for maps. I could not find any that worked out the way I wanted that did not involve me changing the map into something else altogether, so I decided to just make my own. On a normal sheet of paper, I drew out my island country and then scanned it into my computer. From here I blew it up and printed out a portion of it making it easier to do the cities. With this accomplished, it was easier for me to orchestrate events and build a sense of timing.

I had come up with plans for most of the characters. For things to be a little clearer I suppose I should give you the players; they are my wife (Ravel, a druid tanuki), myself (Nyx, a gnome ranger)(yes I am DMing and playing at the same time I have a thought on that here) and our two children (Bree, a halfling wizard and Audi, a dwarf rogue). Audi and Nyx have somewhat involved situations which required an actual kind of script. I had a basic outline for Bree and played mostly by ear. For Ravel, I had absolutely no idea what to do till I sat down to play, and her entire story plot was improvised for that night.

Since none of the characters were coming from the same place it was necessary to play them in a rotation. I started with Bree running short little errands starting from her mentor’s house and traveling around and she will come back to her mentor’s house. I knew where she was going but I hadn’t established any details about the towns or the people within, so that is where all the improve came into play. I also threw in bandit for her to battle who will return somewhat regularly for a short time and asked her for the details about how he looked.

Next, I went to Audi. I knew what I wanted her first mission to be and spent a good deal of time preparing that situation, but I need something for her to do to be in the loop of play. So, I had the “meet up” happen and she was hired to find evidence of corruption in the local government. This part was short but included my son in the play to keep his interest. Her next turn was to case the target place and find her way in and out. That part was unplanned but was easy enough to make up because I had a map already of the house and knew where things were.

I didn’t do any playing for myself just explained, for story’s sake, what my character was interested in and what she would be doing. So, moving on to Ravel. I had no plan for her other than bringing the plot hook that brings all the characters together. I asked her what she was doing and let it roll out from there. Being out for a walk, I realized she could stumble across a group of orcs attacking a merchant cart. This was to be the jumping off point and what leads to the group needing to be formed. This is also where my supplement from DC would come into play a little and it would be the jumping off point.

There was a lot that happened here, from the director’s point of view, that would help me to start finding my own method of play. I found a way to introduce things and to give those things context. The value of working with players to build the world around (since it was my wife I was doing this with it was better to practice). And, a little taste of how my own mechanics changes would work out.

I certainly learned a lot in this first sitting, especially since I had done so little to make myself ready:

    • It is okay to not know what you are doing. The players don’t know what you are doing either.
    • Making things up on the spot may be just as easy as putting the effort in weeks before.
    • Put in some effort to have some idea of what you want to do. Know the purpose, not the details.
    • Don’t be afraid to ask your players about their characters…you might find a way to justify a random action that won’t seems out of place.
    • Also ask your players for details about what they see (ie. The robes of an NPC, buildings, the road). It takes some of the pressure off yourself to come up with things and it immerses them more into the game.
    • Take notes when you or the players make things up to maintain consistency, especially if you plan on returning to a thing at any point with intention or without.

I’m certain there are more things but that is all I can recall at the moment. I’m sure they will come back to me later on as I run into them in later sessions.

Getting Started

Where we started.

I have been eager to start playing D&D again pretty much since the moment I had to stop playing.I have eagerly waited for when I felt my kids were ready to play so I could introduce them to the game. I was sure I would have to wait years, 10 at least, till they were ready to play. With 5e and the streamlined and easier game play, I felt encouraged that maybe they could start playing now, at age four and six. They have active imaginations, love telling stories, and get a real kick out of rolling all the dice.

So I started looking really looking into how to play D&D with kids, What I found was Monster Slayers heroes-of-hesiod and the Champions of the Elements. They were two simple encounters with very simple pre-made characters, easy monsters, and if you hit zero HP you were instantly healed. All the AC’s and HP’s were small numbers for easy math and little bubbles to fill in for easy HP tracking. It was a good place to start but it wasn’t what I was looking for I didn’t want to teach them something D&D like I wanted to play the actual game with them. So I ran the two encounters and used it as a jumping off point and slowly built toward 5e adding elements a little at a time till they understood the mechanics of the game then came diving in a creating all new 5e characters and running their first actual D&D game.

After running the two games as written I used the template of the pre-made characters and made new ones giving each character different skills to give the kids a better general idea of the types of classes they would get to choose from. We made a wizard, a fighter, and an adventurer(rogue type) to help showcase the differences. The wizard could do magic and we gave him resistance to magic attacks to help introduce the idea resistances. The fighter we gave a strength bonus and the highest AC and a bonus to his attacks. For the adventurer, we gave a bonus to search, disable traps, and picking locks. I used the pre-made creatures and drew up a simple dungeon, just 6 rooms, so they would get a chance to use the new skills. We ran the encounter a few different times, moving which doors were locked and where the creatures were and giving the kids a chance to play each different character to figure out which type they preferred playing so it would make it easier when choosing classes later. During the runs of this dungeon, we also started adding disadvantage and advantage rolls as well as gold and items for them to find. With my kids, it took only a few games before the had the basic mechanics down and were remembering (for the most part) to check for traps before running in, and when to roll advantages and before long we were breaking out the 5e characters sheet and rolling our characters. Of course, my non-reader still needs plenty of help with the parts he doesn’t have memorized from regular use, but it’s a good start.

 

 

Creating Spell Effect Area: Cone and Line

This is our process for making clear areas of effect for spells that are a line or cone, specifically in this case for us acid breath and fire breath.

you’ll need:

-permanent marker

-cutting tool (plastic cutter* pictured)

-ruler preferable metal edged so you don’t risk accidentally cutting into the ruler

-clear plastic (clear acrylic pictured)

-sand paper (not pictured)

-clamps (not pictured and optional it just helps keep the plastic from slipping)

*I purchased the plastic cutter for this project because it is the tool designed for it. I found that I didn’t get as good of results as I felt I should have and ended up using a box cutter.

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The Process: The Line

Remove plastic cover if there is any. Measure out for desired spell effect area, in this case, a 5 foot by 30 ft range, with 1inch equaling 5ft.

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Using the ruler as a guide score the plastic along the line several times. Depending on the type of knife you are using you might have to score more or less, with the plastic cutting tool I had to score it 7-9 times and with the box cutter only 4-6 times.

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Brace the plastic on the edge of a flat surface, I just use the edge of the table and apply pressure until it breaks. It should break pretty easy if you are having to apply to much pressure stop and score it a few more times until only light pressure is needed.

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If you are having to apply to much pressure and force you could end up breaking it and run the risk of cutting yourself. Like this:

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Use the same process as above to bring it to the desired length.

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Use the sandpaper at an angle to clean off the bur and smooth out the edges.

Optional step very lightly score the points marking 5ft (1inch) and fill in with the marker.

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Before you can measure your cone you have to know the range, for the cone we are making its 15ft which is 3 inches using the 5ft is an inch measure. The range gives you your end width based on our interpretation of the rule. So this cone is 15ft (3in) long and 15ft (3in) for the width at range (the furthest point). For measuring out the cone mark the width at the widest point, so in this case 15ft (3in). Mark it the same way as the line and use the same scoring and applying pressure to break process.

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Then measure out the length (range) again in this case 15ft (3in). Use the same marking, scoring, breaking process as before.

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Then find the point of origin for the spell (the midpoint of the width side) and mark it for the start point width in this case 5ft (1 inch). Make lines from the outside corners of the point of origin width to the outside corners of the width at range making the cone shape as shown below.

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Then use the same scoring and breaking process to make the cone. Sand off the burs, smooth the edges and add the optional 5ft marking lines.

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And there you have it two DIY areas of effect.

First blog post

Long time D&D player, first time Dungeon Master and mother of two kids age 6 and 4.

I will be blogging about writing and running the game for young kids and the critical hits and critical fails that come with it. I started running the game for the kids a few months ago and will be going back to the beginning in my post.

The Beginning.

We always tried to find time for a family game night even before I introduced D&D to the kids but it was tedious sometimes playing Candyland and similar games so it was hard to stay motivated to carve out time for it. After introducing D&D since we all enjoy it finding time for a family game night was much more fun, for everyone. When we first started I wrote an easy very short encounter aiming at taking around 30 minutes, the attention of my kids based on previous game nights. I was surprised when after they finished the encounter the immediately wanted more, I was unprepared and ended up making encounters up off the top of my head. We played for 2 hours that night and only stopped (with much protest) when I realized it was after bedtime and I had lost track of time. Now I am writing longer encounters and am working on a much longer campaign for them. I have also found plenty of learning opportunities to include such as implementing what they are learning in school in our sessions so they end up doing homework and studying without even realizing it as well as all the situations that arise for critical thinking that I have seen them carry over to real life.

While playing the game with kids isn’t the same as when I was able to get together and play with friends it is still just as fun in it’s own unique way.